Top considerations for your Future SC Software Selection

Top considerations for your Future SC Software Selection

Technology provides capabilities to optimize the operational planning processes of a company. Traditional Supply Chain (SC) software has been widely adopted for a long time, however companies’ No. 1 supply chain priority is to go a step forward on improving its planning capabilities

Given growing SC Complexity and Volatility, it is becoming nearly impossible to revise a complete supply chain without using the latest technology.

Benjamin Nitsche –  SC Volatility Management

Key Functional Capabilities

Let’s imagine that you have a bunch of softwares in scope but it seems impossible to start your comparison.

First of all, focus on how the tools solve complex challenges. Have a look to the following list of key functional capabilities:

  1. Collaboration. External collaboration both with customers and vendors is becoming more common.
  2. Performance Monitoring and Analytics. Includes performance management, business intelligence, alerting, and advanced analytics.
  3. OptimizationBased on a discrete snapshot of reality. Most often applied to inventory and supply planning problems.
  4. Simulation / Scenario Planning. Used to support long-term S&OP or IBP, risk management, SC design, and tactical demand and supply problems.
  5. Scheduling. Resource allocation and operational planning.
  6. Response Management. How quick it reacts to volatility in demand, supply, and product to improve delivery service and operation efficiency.

Choosing a SC Software Vendor

As a good rule, I will recommend you to look for a Suite provider, this means that your vendor must have multifunction product software and your future tool will cover at least four of the functional areas within Supply Chain Planning:

  • Sales & Operations Planning (S&OP)
  • Supply & Replenishment Planning
  • Demand Planning and Forecasting (DP)
  • Vendor Managed Inventory (VMI)
  • Inventory Planning
  • Available to Promise (ATP)
  • Production Planning and Scheduling
  • Distribution Network Planning

Software Evaluation Criteria

In particular for software evaluation you will based your decision-making on the following criteria: Functionality, Technology Alignment, Viability, and Services.

What is more, Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) should be also consider as an important criteria which is separately dealt with using cost benefit analysis.

Functionality

Responsive planning, Optimization, SC design features, S&OP process maturity, Scheduling , Scenario planning / simulation, Advanced analytics, Scalability and speed, Functional roadmap and User interface.

Don’t infuence your decision in marketing and promises, go to the facts. Make your own analysis and visit the professionals on those companies that are using the current solution (see the vendor credentials) and ask them for their feedback, this is going to give you a real approach.

Technology Alignment

Exception and constraints handling, Integration with ERP, other SCP and legacy systems and Compatibility with custom/legacy systems.

Probably the most critical criteria for your IT department because in the future they will have to create interfaces and adapt all the internal reports and documents that your company is using in order to visualize them in the new tool.

Viability

Financial health, Strategic alliances, Availability of support by geography, Total footprint and solution maturity, Market adoption, Vendor direction and Industry specific focus … Not everyone take into account this point but is a very important one.

Nowadays technology companies are involved in many M&A so don’t be surprised that the tool you bought 5 years ago is no longer available and your vendor is not giving you any support because the new company which adquires the rights is not interested at all into maintain it … 

Total Cost of Ownership (TCO)

Total Cost of Ownership considering yearly feeds for all users and Maintenance (very important for future software updates) and support cost.

Finally remember that the real cost of a tool is not going to be only the ammount of zeros that you will pay, always keep in mind future developments and how much are they going to cost you …


Conclusions

To sum up I may say that every project is different, and each client has unique requirements …

Write about your past software experiences and note if there is a bias towards one application over another.

Analyze your environment, especially if your company is focus on one specific software vendor. Establish key project checkpoints … and design a document template in order to do your evaluations of all the points explained before.

Good luck!

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What role will Analytics and Artificial Intelligence play

What role will Analytics and Artificial Intelligence play

The 2018 SAS Health and Life Sciences Executive Forum is an event in which global leaders across the health care ecosystem are coming to discuss key issues and opportunities around next-generation analytics.

The main target of 2018 session held at Madrid was to get a deeper understanding of new analytical technology applications in pharma and health care and their potential benefit to pharmaceutical companies, healthcare providers, and patients and communities worldwide.

For more information visit the SAS Executive forum agenda.

Big Data and 21st century Supply Chains

Big Data and 21st century Supply Chains

Data is everywhere and manufacturing companies today are collecting increasingly massive amounts of data with the help of digital technologies.

New strategies, improved skills and more powerful tools are needed to make sense of that data and crunch the numbers, and find useful insights that are buried in the data. This situation is elevating the importance of Big Data analytics as a critical business capability.

To share few statistics about the amount of data:

  • More than 90% of data in the world today has been created in the last two years, with 80% of it being unstructured, such as images, audio, video, social media, web pages and emails.
  • 1.8 trillion gigabytes of new data were created in 2011.
  • Data is expanding at a rate that doubles every two years.
  • By 2020, the digital universe will be 40 trillion gigabytes.
  • Most U.S. companies have at least 100 terabytes stored.
All companies understand the importance of big data and acknowledge that data analytics of the huge digitized data can help their supply chain process, but the challenge is how to implement it. However, the increased understanding of big data analytics is leading to action, and is becoming a reality.

The trend to implement analytics is on its way and companies have serious plans to incorporate role of analytics in their supply chains.

Optimized supply chain– i.e. delivering the right amount of product to meet market demand while minimizing production, inventory and transportation costs–is a smoothly functioning, comprehensive proposition sought after by all companies. Advances in data analytics, combined with proliferation of data acquisition mechanisms and huge volume of data points, is generating a plethora of possibilities for improving efficiencies in this integrated view of the supply chain.

Earlier, most of the companies sought methods to centralize data to help run their businesses via ERP systems. Now, the concentration is shifting to analytics in to effective decisions with respect to predict customer demand, supplier availability, inventory management, delivery route, etc.

Big Data extends the ability to respond, to predict and, in some cases, even recommend subsequent action, based on insights retrieved from these sources. This takes companies a step ahead in increasing -efficiency in the supply chain. Consequently, the focus is evolving from “supply to replenish” through “supply to forecast” to “supply to prediction based on dynamic pattern analysis”.

Big Data analytics capabilities even have the capacity to reduce supply-side disruptions. For instance, process industries have plant control systems that capture thousands of data points a second. With Big Data techniques, it is possible to proactively adjust parameters in order to improve yield and reduce waste. By identifying potential bottlenecks ahead of time, planners now can account for alternative scenarios and maximize payoff. Moreover, this capability can be used to predict, prevent, or even adapt to equipment failures in transportation, logistics, and warehousing.

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